Ligia MariaGuia de

Ligia Maria
Ligia Maria
Ahli sejak2015
Ligia Maria

Ligia MariaGuia de

Passeios turísticos
What cable cars are to San Francisco and red double-decker buses are to London are what trams are to Lisbon. Tram 28 in particular takes riders on a tourist-friendly route, not only passing through some of the city's most notable neighborhoods including Graça, Baixa and Bairro Alto, but to popular attractions, such as St. George's Castle and Alfama. Along with a scenic route, the cars themselves are also considered to be part of the experience. Many of Lisbon's trams, including some used on the Tram 28 route, are the same that were used in World War II, so don't expect air conditioning, or a smooth trip up and around the area's hills. But don't worry, recent travelers said it's all part of the tram's charm. Some visitors recommend taking the tram up the steep Alfama hill and then walking back down to explore the neighborhood. Due to the tram's popularity, they tend to get crowded quickly, so make sure to arrive early or later in the day to avoid long lines. The tram is 2.90 euros (less than $4) one way and tickets can be purchased on board and at kiosks around the city. Tram 28 hours depend on the route, day of the week and time of the year. Generally, visitors can expect service to start after 7:30 a.m. and end at 9:15 p.m
Tram 28
39 Praça Martim Moniz
What cable cars are to San Francisco and red double-decker buses are to London are what trams are to Lisbon. Tram 28 in particular takes riders on a tourist-friendly route, not only passing through some of the city's most notable neighborhoods including Graça, Baixa and Bairro Alto, but to popular attractions, such as St. George's Castle and Alfama. Along with a scenic route, the cars themselves are also considered to be part of the experience. Many of Lisbon's trams, including some used on the Tram 28 route, are the same that were used in World War II, so don't expect air conditioning, or a smooth trip up and around the area's hills. But don't worry, recent travelers said it's all part of the tram's charm. Some visitors recommend taking the tram up the steep Alfama hill and then walking back down to explore the neighborhood. Due to the tram's popularity, they tend to get crowded quickly, so make sure to arrive early or later in the day to avoid long lines. The tram is 2.90 euros (less than $4) one way and tickets can be purchased on board and at kiosks around the city. Tram 28 hours depend on the route, day of the week and time of the year. Generally, visitors can expect service to start after 7:30 a.m. and end at 9:15 p.m
The waterfront Belém is a historic neighborhood that houses some of Lisbon's most important monuments, museums and one very popular Portuguese tart place, the Pasteis de Belém. Here you'll find the JERONIMOS MONASTERY, the BELÉM TOWER, the DISCOVERIES MONUMENT, the BELÉM PALACE (the official residence of Portugal's president), the Coleção Berardo Museum as well as a number of scenic gardens. As the Discoveries Monument beautifully illustrates, Belém is important in that it was a popular departure point during the Age of Discoveries. Some notable adventurers that have embarked from Belém include Vasco da Gama, who was the first person to sail directly from Europe to India, and Ferdinand Magellan, who was aboard the first ship that successfully circumnavigated the world. In addition, Christopher Columbus also made a stop here on his way back to Spain from the Americas. Recent travelers enjoyed all that Belem has to offer, especially the stunning Belem Tower and the Discoveries Monument. Most visitors, however, expressed disappointment with the amount of tourists that are seemingly always at the sites. Because of this, some travelers instead recommended simply grabbing a pastel de nata at Pasteis de Belem, taking a nice long stroll along the Tagus riverfront and admiring the waterfront attractions outside instead of waiting in long lines to go inside. Belem is located about 6 miles west of central Lisbon and is accessible via a metro stop of the same name or you can rent a bike
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Belém
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The waterfront Belém is a historic neighborhood that houses some of Lisbon's most important monuments, museums and one very popular Portuguese tart place, the Pasteis de Belém. Here you'll find the JERONIMOS MONASTERY, the BELÉM TOWER, the DISCOVERIES MONUMENT, the BELÉM PALACE (the official residence of Portugal's president), the Coleção Berardo Museum as well as a number of scenic gardens. As the Discoveries Monument beautifully illustrates, Belém is important in that it was a popular departure point during the Age of Discoveries. Some notable adventurers that have embarked from Belém include Vasco da Gama, who was the first person to sail directly from Europe to India, and Ferdinand Magellan, who was aboard the first ship that successfully circumnavigated the world. In addition, Christopher Columbus also made a stop here on his way back to Spain from the Americas. Recent travelers enjoyed all that Belem has to offer, especially the stunning Belem Tower and the Discoveries Monument. Most visitors, however, expressed disappointment with the amount of tourists that are seemingly always at the sites. Because of this, some travelers instead recommended simply grabbing a pastel de nata at Pasteis de Belem, taking a nice long stroll along the Tagus riverfront and admiring the waterfront attractions outside instead of waiting in long lines to go inside. Belem is located about 6 miles west of central Lisbon and is accessible via a metro stop of the same name or you can rent a bike
For some sweeping views of Lisbon – particularly St. George's Castle, Rossio Square and the Baixa neighborhood – you might want to take a ride on the Elevador de Santa Justa. Designed by Raoul Mesnier du Ponsard (a former student of Gustave Eiffel – creator of the Eiffel tower), this neo-Gothic elevator is more than a century old and used to be powered by steam. The structure is more than just a means to meet a vista's end, but rather a convenient shortcut for commuters looking to get to Bairro Alto without having to work up the sweat climbing the hill. While the exterior is almost entirely wrought iron, inside visitors will find two old-fashioned cabins that take visitors up to the nearly 150-foot-tall vantage point. Although visitors were more than pleased with the views, some visitors found the attraction to be a rip-off, especially since are so many free viewpoints throughout Lisbon. Travelers also complained of the long lines throughout the day and suggested going either very early in the day or very late at night, but even that isn't a guarantee. A great way to skip the lines is to enter the tower from Bairro Alto and pay 1.50 euros (less than $2) to access the observation deck. To ride the elevator up to the observation deck and back down, it'll cost you 5 euros (about $6). You can find the Santa Justa Elevator in the Baixa neighborhood, situated between the Baixa-Chiado and Rossio metro stops.
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Santa Justa Lift
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For some sweeping views of Lisbon – particularly St. George's Castle, Rossio Square and the Baixa neighborhood – you might want to take a ride on the Elevador de Santa Justa. Designed by Raoul Mesnier du Ponsard (a former student of Gustave Eiffel – creator of the Eiffel tower), this neo-Gothic elevator is more than a century old and used to be powered by steam. The structure is more than just a means to meet a vista's end, but rather a convenient shortcut for commuters looking to get to Bairro Alto without having to work up the sweat climbing the hill. While the exterior is almost entirely wrought iron, inside visitors will find two old-fashioned cabins that take visitors up to the nearly 150-foot-tall vantage point. Although visitors were more than pleased with the views, some visitors found the attraction to be a rip-off, especially since are so many free viewpoints throughout Lisbon. Travelers also complained of the long lines throughout the day and suggested going either very early in the day or very late at night, but even that isn't a guarantee. A great way to skip the lines is to enter the tower from Bairro Alto and pay 1.50 euros (less than $2) to access the observation deck. To ride the elevator up to the observation deck and back down, it'll cost you 5 euros (about $6). You can find the Santa Justa Elevator in the Baixa neighborhood, situated between the Baixa-Chiado and Rossio metro stops.
Museum of Art, Architecture and Technology is the new cultural centre for Lisbon. It’s a museum where these three areas intertwine within a space of debate, discovery, critical thinking and international dialogue. It’s an innovative project which establishes a connection between the new building, designed by Amanda Levete Architects’ studio, and Central Tejo Power Station, one of Portugal’s most prominent examples of industrial architecture from the first half of the 20th century, and one of the most visited museums in the country. Children Free until (age): 18 ,Adult: 5 €, Senior: 2,50 € Av. Brasília, Central Tejo (Belém)
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MAAT
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Museum of Art, Architecture and Technology is the new cultural centre for Lisbon. It’s a museum where these three areas intertwine within a space of debate, discovery, critical thinking and international dialogue. It’s an innovative project which establishes a connection between the new building, designed by Amanda Levete Architects’ studio, and Central Tejo Power Station, one of Portugal’s most prominent examples of industrial architecture from the first half of the 20th century, and one of the most visited museums in the country. Children Free until (age): 18 ,Adult: 5 €, Senior: 2,50 € Av. Brasília, Central Tejo (Belém)
Castelo de São Jorge, or St. George's Castle, is perched atop Lisbon's highest hill in Alfama, offering both excellent history and views of the city. The castle served as a fortification for the Romans, Visigoths and the Moors, who turned it into a royal palace before it was eventually taken by Portugal's first king, Afonso Henriques. The attraction has kept much of the building's relics intact, including canons, which are spread throughout, underground chambers and 18 towers, one of which houses a camera obscura. There is also a restaurant on-site, gardens where wildlife frequently make appearances and an archaeological museum. Visitors gushed about the incredible views of the city and the sea. But although most were impressed with its quality preservation, many found the attraction to be lacking, as there isn't much to do on-site. The Castelo de São Jorge is open from 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. November through February, with extended hours from March to October. Admission is 8.50 ($9.50) euros for adults and is free for children younger than 10 years of age. You can reach the attraction from Tram 28, or walk from the two nearest metro stations, Martim Moniz and Rossio.
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Castelo de S. Jorge
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Castelo de São Jorge, or St. George's Castle, is perched atop Lisbon's highest hill in Alfama, offering both excellent history and views of the city. The castle served as a fortification for the Romans, Visigoths and the Moors, who turned it into a royal palace before it was eventually taken by Portugal's first king, Afonso Henriques. The attraction has kept much of the building's relics intact, including canons, which are spread throughout, underground chambers and 18 towers, one of which houses a camera obscura. There is also a restaurant on-site, gardens where wildlife frequently make appearances and an archaeological museum. Visitors gushed about the incredible views of the city and the sea. But although most were impressed with its quality preservation, many found the attraction to be lacking, as there isn't much to do on-site. The Castelo de São Jorge is open from 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. November through February, with extended hours from March to October. Admission is 8.50 ($9.50) euros for adults and is free for children younger than 10 years of age. You can reach the attraction from Tram 28, or walk from the two nearest metro stations, Martim Moniz and Rossio.
Located about 20 miles northwest of central Lisbon, Sintra's praises have been sung in literature by the likes of British poet Lord Byron and Portuguese poet Luis Vaz de Camões; Byron described it as a "glorious Eden." A veritable heaven on earth, the small city's rolling hills are clad with vibrant vegetation and fairytale-like villas separated by cobblestone streets. The star of the show is the colorful Palácio Nacional de Pena, which was built to be a romantic getaway for Queen Maria II and her husband. There's also the Palacio Nachional de Sintra, whose azulejo-adorned interiors make up for its bland exteriors, the Monserrate Palace, the Castle of the Moors, and the Quinta da Regaleira. What's more, the entire city is designated as a UNESCO World Heritage site. Travelers thoroughly enjoyed hopping back and forth between what many visitors described as beautiful palaces, villas and castles that Sintra had to offer, but recommended stamina and sturdy pair of shoes, as the area is very hilly. To get from Lisbon to Sintra, you can take the train from the Rossio train station. You could drive as well (though parking will be tricky), or take one of the local buses.
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Sintra
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Located about 20 miles northwest of central Lisbon, Sintra's praises have been sung in literature by the likes of British poet Lord Byron and Portuguese poet Luis Vaz de Camões; Byron described it as a "glorious Eden." A veritable heaven on earth, the small city's rolling hills are clad with vibrant vegetation and fairytale-like villas separated by cobblestone streets. The star of the show is the colorful Palácio Nacional de Pena, which was built to be a romantic getaway for Queen Maria II and her husband. There's also the Palacio Nachional de Sintra, whose azulejo-adorned interiors make up for its bland exteriors, the Monserrate Palace, the Castle of the Moors, and the Quinta da Regaleira. What's more, the entire city is designated as a UNESCO World Heritage site. Travelers thoroughly enjoyed hopping back and forth between what many visitors described as beautiful palaces, villas and castles that Sintra had to offer, but recommended stamina and sturdy pair of shoes, as the area is very hilly. To get from Lisbon to Sintra, you can take the train from the Rossio train station. You could drive as well (though parking will be tricky), or take one of the local buses.
The seaside town of Cascais (kush-kaish) is a 45-minute train ride west of Lisbon's Cais do Sodré station. Once a fishing village, Cascais became a popular respite for the rich and royal in the 1900s. Today, Europeans of all kinds flock to this beachy city for some low-cost fun in the sun. And since it's peppered with luxurious resorts and hotels, a weekend here may be an ideal end to your Lisbon vacation. And don't be put off by its size, there is plenty to do here. Take a stroll around the colorful, cobblestone-lined old town, visit one of the area's many forts that helped prevent pirate attacks, or lay back on one of the area's many beaches. If you're looking for something small, adorable and quintessentially Mediterranean, look to Praia da Rainha, or the Queen's Beach. Not only is this beach a 5-minute walk from the train station, but so are two other beaches: Praia da Conceição and Praia da Duquesa. If you're looking for something a little off the beaten path, not to mention a much wider shoreline, head to Praia do Guincho, about 5 miles northeast of the city center. There's also the popular Boca do Inferno cliff lookout point nearer Cascais' city center. To learn more, visit the Cascais page on the Visit Portugal site.
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Cascais
14 Rua Visconde da Luz
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The seaside town of Cascais (kush-kaish) is a 45-minute train ride west of Lisbon's Cais do Sodré station. Once a fishing village, Cascais became a popular respite for the rich and royal in the 1900s. Today, Europeans of all kinds flock to this beachy city for some low-cost fun in the sun. And since it's peppered with luxurious resorts and hotels, a weekend here may be an ideal end to your Lisbon vacation. And don't be put off by its size, there is plenty to do here. Take a stroll around the colorful, cobblestone-lined old town, visit one of the area's many forts that helped prevent pirate attacks, or lay back on one of the area's many beaches. If you're looking for something small, adorable and quintessentially Mediterranean, look to Praia da Rainha, or the Queen's Beach. Not only is this beach a 5-minute walk from the train station, but so are two other beaches: Praia da Conceição and Praia da Duquesa. If you're looking for something a little off the beaten path, not to mention a much wider shoreline, head to Praia do Guincho, about 5 miles northeast of the city center. There's also the popular Boca do Inferno cliff lookout point nearer Cascais' city center. To learn more, visit the Cascais page on the Visit Portugal site.
Lisbon's huge riverfront square, Praça do Comércio, is impressive enough seen from the ground, but it's only when viewed from the Arco da Rua Augusta that its vast dimensions can really be appreciated. The landmark 19th-century arch lies at the northern edge of the concourse near the southern tip of Rua Augusta, the city's main pedestrianized thoroughfare. Designed by Portuguese architect Santos de Carvalho and built to mark the reconstruction of the capital after the 1755 earthquake, the monument was inaugurated in 1873. It's only recently that the public has been allowed to visit the top of the arch, where a terrace is surmounted by an allegorical statue of Glory, itself crowning figures representing Bravery and Genius and decorated with wreaths. Below this, an entablature supports additional statues of national heroes including Vasco da Gamaand the Marquês de Pombal. An elevator deposits visitors near the top, after which a steep spiral staircase needs to be navigated in order to reach the terrace. From here, the view south is majestic and stretches away across the square and over the river. Turn north, and the vista takes in Rua Augusta and Lisbon's entire Baixa (downtown) district. A mechanical clock on the platform made in 1941 strikes the hour and half hour. The clock's mechanism, based inside the arch, can be admired in all its intricate detail as can an illustrated panel outlining the arch's own historic timeline. Address: Rua Augusta, Lisbon
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Praça do Comércio
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Lisbon's huge riverfront square, Praça do Comércio, is impressive enough seen from the ground, but it's only when viewed from the Arco da Rua Augusta that its vast dimensions can really be appreciated. The landmark 19th-century arch lies at the northern edge of the concourse near the southern tip of Rua Augusta, the city's main pedestrianized thoroughfare. Designed by Portuguese architect Santos de Carvalho and built to mark the reconstruction of the capital after the 1755 earthquake, the monument was inaugurated in 1873. It's only recently that the public has been allowed to visit the top of the arch, where a terrace is surmounted by an allegorical statue of Glory, itself crowning figures representing Bravery and Genius and decorated with wreaths. Below this, an entablature supports additional statues of national heroes including Vasco da Gamaand the Marquês de Pombal. An elevator deposits visitors near the top, after which a steep spiral staircase needs to be navigated in order to reach the terrace. From here, the view south is majestic and stretches away across the square and over the river. Turn north, and the vista takes in Rua Augusta and Lisbon's entire Baixa (downtown) district. A mechanical clock on the platform made in 1941 strikes the hour and half hour. The clock's mechanism, based inside the arch, can be admired in all its intricate detail as can an illustrated panel outlining the arch's own historic timeline. Address: Rua Augusta, Lisbon
The Oceanário de Lisboa is not just an aquarium, but considering its size, a world in and of itself. The Oceanarium, as it's also often referred to, is Portugal's largest indoor aquarium, holding more than one million gallons of seawater supporting the lives of 8,000 sea creatures. Four permanent exhibits represent different habitats that hold the likes of various types of birds, fish, amphibians and mammals. Here, visitors will find the likes of sea stars and coral to penguins, puffins and sea otters and everything in between. Along with a peek into life under the sea, the Oceanarium also offers a variety of activities, from guided tours to a sleepover with sharks and even a Fado show. Visitors were blown away by how impressive the aquarium was. Many in particular loved the large, central tank, and said the attraction could easily be enjoyed by all ages, and not just children. Travelers advised setting aside at least half a day to see the attraction. You can find the Oceanarium in the Parque das Nações, the more contemporary part of town, off of the Oriente metro stop. Admission is 16.20 euros (roughly $19) for adults and 10.80 euros (about $13) for children 4 to 12 years old. The aquarium is open from 10 a.m. to 8 p.m. daily; during the winter (which starts Oct. 30), it's open from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. For more information, visit the Oceanarium's website.
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Oceanário de Lisboa
s/nº Esplanada Dom Carlos I
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The Oceanário de Lisboa is not just an aquarium, but considering its size, a world in and of itself. The Oceanarium, as it's also often referred to, is Portugal's largest indoor aquarium, holding more than one million gallons of seawater supporting the lives of 8,000 sea creatures. Four permanent exhibits represent different habitats that hold the likes of various types of birds, fish, amphibians and mammals. Here, visitors will find the likes of sea stars and coral to penguins, puffins and sea otters and everything in between. Along with a peek into life under the sea, the Oceanarium also offers a variety of activities, from guided tours to a sleepover with sharks and even a Fado show. Visitors were blown away by how impressive the aquarium was. Many in particular loved the large, central tank, and said the attraction could easily be enjoyed by all ages, and not just children. Travelers advised setting aside at least half a day to see the attraction. You can find the Oceanarium in the Parque das Nações, the more contemporary part of town, off of the Oriente metro stop. Admission is 16.20 euros (roughly $19) for adults and 10.80 euros (about $13) for children 4 to 12 years old. The aquarium is open from 10 a.m. to 8 p.m. daily; during the winter (which starts Oct. 30), it's open from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. For more information, visit the Oceanarium's website.
Located somewhat off the tourist trail east of the city center, the National Tile Museum is worth seeking out for its unique collection of azulejos - decorative tiles - and the fabulously ornate Igreja Madre de Deus. Housed within the church and cloisters of the Convento da Madre de Deus, this is the only museum in Portugal dedicated to this historic art form. The permanent exhibition traces the evolution of tile-making from Moorish days through Spanish influence and the emergence of Portugal's own style. Exhibited chronologically, some of the earliest examples date from the 15th century and are displayed as complete panels of intricate patterns in vivid colors. Portuguese tile work features the more familiar blue and white azulejos, with one outstanding piece, a 36-meter tiled panorama of pre-earthquake Lisbon, one of the highlights of the collection. Entry to the museum includes access to the 16th-century church of Madre de Deus. Here, visitors are treated to one of the most ebullient and decorative church interiors anywhere in Portugal, a sumptuous Baroque showcase of gilded woodwork, shimmering 17th-century azulejos, and a stunning Rococo altarpiece. Hours: Tue-Sun 10am-6pm (last entry 5:30pm), closed Mon and public holidays Admission: Adults €5.00, over 65 €2.50, children (15-18) traveling with parents €2.50, children under 14 free Address: Rua da Madre de Deus 4, Lisbon
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Museu Nacional do Azulejo
4 R. Me. Deus
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Located somewhat off the tourist trail east of the city center, the National Tile Museum is worth seeking out for its unique collection of azulejos - decorative tiles - and the fabulously ornate Igreja Madre de Deus. Housed within the church and cloisters of the Convento da Madre de Deus, this is the only museum in Portugal dedicated to this historic art form. The permanent exhibition traces the evolution of tile-making from Moorish days through Spanish influence and the emergence of Portugal's own style. Exhibited chronologically, some of the earliest examples date from the 15th century and are displayed as complete panels of intricate patterns in vivid colors. Portuguese tile work features the more familiar blue and white azulejos, with one outstanding piece, a 36-meter tiled panorama of pre-earthquake Lisbon, one of the highlights of the collection. Entry to the museum includes access to the 16th-century church of Madre de Deus. Here, visitors are treated to one of the most ebullient and decorative church interiors anywhere in Portugal, a sumptuous Baroque showcase of gilded woodwork, shimmering 17th-century azulejos, and a stunning Rococo altarpiece. Hours: Tue-Sun 10am-6pm (last entry 5:30pm), closed Mon and public holidays Admission: Adults €5.00, over 65 €2.50, children (15-18) traveling with parents €2.50, children under 14 free Address: Rua da Madre de Deus 4, Lisbon
Less than 50 years old, the Gulbenkian Museum hangs a world-renowned collection of art. The late Calouste Gulbenkian, a former oil tycoon and distinguished art collector, amassed 6,000 works of art in his lifetime, donating it all to Portugal upon his death. The diverse selection on display includes art of all kinds from all over the world, including Egyptian statues, European paintings from masters Rubens and Rembrandt, and Chinese porcelain, to name a few. Recent travelers enjoyed perusing the museum, with many saying the long trip away from the city center was worth it. Visitors not only appreciated the museum's diversity of art, but some were delightfully dumbfounded it all came from one person. Ticket prices depend on which exhibits you want to see, but expect to pay 11.50 euros (less than $14) to have access to all of the property's collections. Children 17 and younger can visit for free when with an adult. Entry on Sundays is waived after 2 p.m. The museum is open from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. daily, but the museum is closed on Tuesdays. You'll find this top spot off the São Sebastião or the Praça de Espanha metro stops.
Gulbenkian Modern Arts Museum
Less than 50 years old, the Gulbenkian Museum hangs a world-renowned collection of art. The late Calouste Gulbenkian, a former oil tycoon and distinguished art collector, amassed 6,000 works of art in his lifetime, donating it all to Portugal upon his death. The diverse selection on display includes art of all kinds from all over the world, including Egyptian statues, European paintings from masters Rubens and Rembrandt, and Chinese porcelain, to name a few. Recent travelers enjoyed perusing the museum, with many saying the long trip away from the city center was worth it. Visitors not only appreciated the museum's diversity of art, but some were delightfully dumbfounded it all came from one person. Ticket prices depend on which exhibits you want to see, but expect to pay 11.50 euros (less than $14) to have access to all of the property's collections. Children 17 and younger can visit for free when with an adult. Entry on Sundays is waived after 2 p.m. The museum is open from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. daily, but the museum is closed on Tuesdays. You'll find this top spot off the São Sebastião or the Praça de Espanha metro stops.
Bairros
A visit to the picturesque Alfama is a must. With a history that dates back to the Moors, Alfama is characterized by narrow, cobblestone streets that wind past dozens of quaint shops, cozy little restaurants and traditional Fado clubs, all of which are housed within historic yet well-preserved architecture. Popular city attractions like St. George's Castle, Sé Cathedral and Feira de Ladra are also located in Alfama. Travelers come in droves to bear witness to the neighborhood's famed charm (and some street art), and say this is the best place to get to know Lisbon. Visitors also say this isn't an attraction to breeze through, but rather take your time with and get lost in. Ditch the map and let yourself wander the colorful streets, grab a drink alfresco in an alleyway, or seek out one of the neighborhood's many vantage points, including the popular Miradouro de Santa Luzia, or the Miradouro Sophia de Mello Breyner Andresen. There are two metro stops near Alfama. Martim Moniz is located at the top of the hilly neighborhood while Lisboa Santa Apolonia is a little farther away but the closest stop to the bottom
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Alfama
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A visit to the picturesque Alfama is a must. With a history that dates back to the Moors, Alfama is characterized by narrow, cobblestone streets that wind past dozens of quaint shops, cozy little restaurants and traditional Fado clubs, all of which are housed within historic yet well-preserved architecture. Popular city attractions like St. George's Castle, Sé Cathedral and Feira de Ladra are also located in Alfama. Travelers come in droves to bear witness to the neighborhood's famed charm (and some street art), and say this is the best place to get to know Lisbon. Visitors also say this isn't an attraction to breeze through, but rather take your time with and get lost in. Ditch the map and let yourself wander the colorful streets, grab a drink alfresco in an alleyway, or seek out one of the neighborhood's many vantage points, including the popular Miradouro de Santa Luzia, or the Miradouro Sophia de Mello Breyner Andresen. There are two metro stops near Alfama. Martim Moniz is located at the top of the hilly neighborhood while Lisboa Santa Apolonia is a little farther away but the closest stop to the bottom
Cena gastronômica
Time Out Market is becoming more and more one of the top things to do in Lisbon for all visitors. The food court of Lisbon’s historic market hall – the Mercado da Ribeira – was taken over by Time Out in early 2014. The revamped (and bustling) Time Out Mercado da Ribeira is now home to 35 permanent stalls from some of Lisbon’s most celebrated foodie shops and restaurants. Try Portuguese wines from Garrafeira Nacional, ice-creams from Santini, and pastries from Aloma – or get a flavour of one of the country’s culinary heroes, Henrique Sá Pessoa, at his on-site eaterie.
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1. Time Out Market
49 Av. 24 de Julho
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Time Out Market is becoming more and more one of the top things to do in Lisbon for all visitors. The food court of Lisbon’s historic market hall – the Mercado da Ribeira – was taken over by Time Out in early 2014. The revamped (and bustling) Time Out Mercado da Ribeira is now home to 35 permanent stalls from some of Lisbon’s most celebrated foodie shops and restaurants. Try Portuguese wines from Garrafeira Nacional, ice-creams from Santini, and pastries from Aloma – or get a flavour of one of the country’s culinary heroes, Henrique Sá Pessoa, at his on-site eaterie.
It all began in 1846 when a threads and fabrics company called “Companhia de Fiação e Tecidos Lisbonense”, one of the most important manufacturing complexes in Lisbon, moved to Alcântara, a quarter located on the way to Belém. Other companies moved as well to the 23.000 m2 industrial site during the golden industrial age. Alcântara was a busy place that time, but not anymore… Now, and since 2008, a new urban fragment has been born again in one of the most industrial abandoned areas of Lisbon. If Lisbon’s metamorphosis started with the Expo98, the next step was the LX Factory – It’s a giant atelier full of galleries to discover with traditional restaurants, design shops and even concert halls. This new creative island in the ruins of a gigantic abandoned industrial site reminds me a little of Tacheles in Berlin. Of course, it’s not an underground place, and everything has been renewed and the buildings are not falling apart. After much work renewing the whole space, the new factory was occupied by corporations, new brands, startups and wanna-be-artists. The place is decorated with huge, colorful graffiti-style murals on the exterior walls. Lx Factory is a creative mini-city. From architecture to music, it’s now the home of design companies, galleries and artists studios. There are small trendy restaurants, hipster shops, visual and performing arts, music, fashion and one of the best ice creams in town
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LxFactory
103 R. Rodrigues de Faria
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It all began in 1846 when a threads and fabrics company called “Companhia de Fiação e Tecidos Lisbonense”, one of the most important manufacturing complexes in Lisbon, moved to Alcântara, a quarter located on the way to Belém. Other companies moved as well to the 23.000 m2 industrial site during the golden industrial age. Alcântara was a busy place that time, but not anymore… Now, and since 2008, a new urban fragment has been born again in one of the most industrial abandoned areas of Lisbon. If Lisbon’s metamorphosis started with the Expo98, the next step was the LX Factory – It’s a giant atelier full of galleries to discover with traditional restaurants, design shops and even concert halls. This new creative island in the ruins of a gigantic abandoned industrial site reminds me a little of Tacheles in Berlin. Of course, it’s not an underground place, and everything has been renewed and the buildings are not falling apart. After much work renewing the whole space, the new factory was occupied by corporations, new brands, startups and wanna-be-artists. The place is decorated with huge, colorful graffiti-style murals on the exterior walls. Lx Factory is a creative mini-city. From architecture to music, it’s now the home of design companies, galleries and artists studios. There are small trendy restaurants, hipster shops, visual and performing arts, music, fashion and one of the best ice creams in town