Guia Meet Your Host

João
Guia Meet Your Host

Passeio turístico

Bica Houses - Welcome Lisbon Guide
Lisbon's most photographed street is probably Rua da Bica Duarte Belo. It's in the historic and picturesque neighborhood of Bica, one of the city's most traditional neighborhoods, known for its small bars and especially for the iconic funicular that runs through it. Constantly photographed by tourists, the funicular designed by the Portuguese engineer of French parentage Raoul Mesnier du Ponsard who died in 1914 at the age of 66 is the connection between Largo do Calhariz and Rua de São Paulo since 1892. This funicular is a national monument and one of the main reasons that turned Rua da Bica Duarte Belo in the tourist attraction it is today. The tiny neighborhood, found between the Bairro Alto and Cais do Sodré districts, is made up of cobbled lanes and stairways, dating back to 1597, after a landslide. The land belonged to an influential Jew with ties to King João II, and was first inhabited by fishermen and fishwives. The name comes from a 17th-century water fountain ("bica"), although there are several in the area, that belonged to Duarte Belo, a local merchant. The fountains were popular meeting places, filling the neighborhood with life. Little affected by the 1755 earthquake, Bica offers a beautiful view of the river, and maintains the colorful 17th- and 18th-century buildings, many of them always with open doors, flower-filled balconies and laundry out to dry.
Bica, Lisboa
42 R. da Bica de Duarte Belo
Lisbon's most photographed street is probably Rua da Bica Duarte Belo. It's in the historic and picturesque neighborhood of Bica, one of the city's most traditional neighborhoods, known for its small bars and especially for the iconic funicular that runs through it. Constantly photographed by tourists, the funicular designed by the Portuguese engineer of French parentage Raoul Mesnier du Ponsard who died in 1914 at the age of 66 is the connection between Largo do Calhariz and Rua de São Paulo since 1892. This funicular is a national monument and one of the main reasons that turned Rua da Bica Duarte Belo in the tourist attraction it is today. The tiny neighborhood, found between the Bairro Alto and Cais do Sodré districts, is made up of cobbled lanes and stairways, dating back to 1597, after a landslide. The land belonged to an influential Jew with ties to King João II, and was first inhabited by fishermen and fishwives. The name comes from a 17th-century water fountain ("bica"), although there are several in the area, that belonged to Duarte Belo, a local merchant. The fountains were popular meeting places, filling the neighborhood with life. Little affected by the 1755 earthquake, Bica offers a beautiful view of the river, and maintains the colorful 17th- and 18th-century buildings, many of them always with open doors, flower-filled balconies and laundry out to dry.
The Baixa Pombalina is an elegant district, primarily constructed after the 1755 Lisbon earthquake ad it was named after Sebastião José de Carvalho e Melo, 1st Marquis of Pombal. The Baixa Pombalina is one of the first examples of earthquake-resistant construction, architectural models were tested by having troops march around them to simulate an earthquake. The current grid pattern strongly differs from the organic street plan that characterized the district before the earthquake. It is replete with architectural marvels and aesthetically pleasing sets, being deemed the most elegant of all districts in Lisbon. This is where you’ll find the city’s most popular and best-known areas. The historic center – the Baixa Pombalina, with its traditional shops and museums, and the lively streets of Chiado, with their eclectic mix of contemporary and traditional stores – are some of the city’s main places of interest. Chiado is the popular shopping and theatre district of Lisbon, which has a selection of historic monuments, tradition shops, theaters, charming old bookshops and major international brands, giving it a lively cosmopolitan ambience at any time of the day. Baixa is simultaneously the shopping and banking district of the city, but the bottom line is it stands out as one of the highest rated tourist hotspots in the capital of Portugal.
Baixa-Chiado
The Baixa Pombalina is an elegant district, primarily constructed after the 1755 Lisbon earthquake ad it was named after Sebastião José de Carvalho e Melo, 1st Marquis of Pombal. The Baixa Pombalina is one of the first examples of earthquake-resistant construction, architectural models were tested by having troops march around them to simulate an earthquake. The current grid pattern strongly differs from the organic street plan that characterized the district before the earthquake. It is replete with architectural marvels and aesthetically pleasing sets, being deemed the most elegant of all districts in Lisbon. This is where you’ll find the city’s most popular and best-known areas. The historic center – the Baixa Pombalina, with its traditional shops and museums, and the lively streets of Chiado, with their eclectic mix of contemporary and traditional stores – are some of the city’s main places of interest. Chiado is the popular shopping and theatre district of Lisbon, which has a selection of historic monuments, tradition shops, theaters, charming old bookshops and major international brands, giving it a lively cosmopolitan ambience at any time of the day. Baixa is simultaneously the shopping and banking district of the city, but the bottom line is it stands out as one of the highest rated tourist hotspots in the capital of Portugal.
These two Lisbon zones have always been intimately connected not only for their proximity but also because they’ve always complemented each other. After they were destroyed in the earthquake of 1755 Ribeira das Naus was built as the Portuguese biggest ship yard, and Cais do Sodré was not only the place where you could find the building support for the construction/maintenance of those ships but also where the sailors could find the escape for the hard and lonely sea life. Over time Cais do Sodré became one of Lisbon's seediest neighborhoods. Its backstreets were the haunt of whisky-slugging sailors craving a little after-dark sleaze; a lackluster place where brothels sidled up to sweaty clubs. But suddenly everything changed once again, in late 2011, the district was given a makeover. Its main street, Rua Nova do Carvalho, was painted a welcoming bright pink and the call girls were sent packing, but the edginess and decadence on which Lisbon thrives remained. Live music venues, burlesque clubs and tapas bars began to pop up with astonishing frequency, and soon thereafter, Cais do Sodré became Lisbon's most happening nightlife district, and once again, Cais do Sodré and Ribeira das Naus keep evolving side by side. Shortly after Cais do Sodré was given this new life Ribeira das Naus kept up and became one of the best spots in Lisbon to appreciate the sun, take a long walk in the riverside or just relax and take a drink while you appreciate his amazing view.
Cais do Sodré
These two Lisbon zones have always been intimately connected not only for their proximity but also because they’ve always complemented each other. After they were destroyed in the earthquake of 1755 Ribeira das Naus was built as the Portuguese biggest ship yard, and Cais do Sodré was not only the place where you could find the building support for the construction/maintenance of those ships but also where the sailors could find the escape for the hard and lonely sea life. Over time Cais do Sodré became one of Lisbon's seediest neighborhoods. Its backstreets were the haunt of whisky-slugging sailors craving a little after-dark sleaze; a lackluster place where brothels sidled up to sweaty clubs. But suddenly everything changed once again, in late 2011, the district was given a makeover. Its main street, Rua Nova do Carvalho, was painted a welcoming bright pink and the call girls were sent packing, but the edginess and decadence on which Lisbon thrives remained. Live music venues, burlesque clubs and tapas bars began to pop up with astonishing frequency, and soon thereafter, Cais do Sodré became Lisbon's most happening nightlife district, and once again, Cais do Sodré and Ribeira das Naus keep evolving side by side. Shortly after Cais do Sodré was given this new life Ribeira das Naus kept up and became one of the best spots in Lisbon to appreciate the sun, take a long walk in the riverside or just relax and take a drink while you appreciate his amazing view.
This colorful sailor’s district is the core, where the rest of the city began. It was inhabited by the Romans and later became the center of the Visigoths; however, the Moors firmly secured their foothold here. The small community guards its picturesque and traditional appearance, preserving it as a relic from the period before the 1755 earthquake that fortunately had no impact in this lovely neighborhood. Walking around the streets of Alfama, you’ll find a new surprise around every corner, as brightly painted houses with endearing small shops, cafes, and eateries tingle your senses. In the many souvenir shops, one can find various travel memorabilia while the restaurants serve fresh seafood plates and mouth-watering pastéis de nata (custard cream tarts), bacalhau and it is where you can find the oldest “Fado” restaurants in Lisbon.
290 penduduk tempatan mengesyorkan
Alfama
290 penduduk tempatan mengesyorkan
This colorful sailor’s district is the core, where the rest of the city began. It was inhabited by the Romans and later became the center of the Visigoths; however, the Moors firmly secured their foothold here. The small community guards its picturesque and traditional appearance, preserving it as a relic from the period before the 1755 earthquake that fortunately had no impact in this lovely neighborhood. Walking around the streets of Alfama, you’ll find a new surprise around every corner, as brightly painted houses with endearing small shops, cafes, and eateries tingle your senses. In the many souvenir shops, one can find various travel memorabilia while the restaurants serve fresh seafood plates and mouth-watering pastéis de nata (custard cream tarts), bacalhau and it is where you can find the oldest “Fado” restaurants in Lisbon.
Graça dates back to the foundation of Agostinhos Convent, a thirteenth century construction under the name of St. Augustine. The neighborhood, which back then was little more than farming land, remained very sparsely inhabited for centuries. The big turning point in the Graça neighborhood history only occurred after the earthquake of 1755, though. The reconstruction of the city led an increasingly large number of workers to seek Graça to reside in. Not only was the land cheap, but the neighborhood was also close to downtown. It was only in the early twentieth century that the neighborhood definitely lost its rural aspect, with the construction of the Santa Apolónia railway. This revolutionized the industrial life of the neighborhood, which suddenly saw the emergence of multiple ateliers, and attracted many working class and white-collar workers. This dynamism led to several associations such as the Savings Bank Workers and Desportivo da Graça Club. Nowadays Graça is this charming neighborhood where you can find a mixture of old and new, where the spirit of old Lisbon and the renewal brought about by the new inhabitants and tourists is felt while you can appreciate the best viewpoints in Lisboa. The viewpoint of Graça and the viewpoint of Senhora do Monte will allow you to enjoy an unobstructed view over the capital.
7 penduduk tempatan mengesyorkan
Graça
7 penduduk tempatan mengesyorkan
Graça dates back to the foundation of Agostinhos Convent, a thirteenth century construction under the name of St. Augustine. The neighborhood, which back then was little more than farming land, remained very sparsely inhabited for centuries. The big turning point in the Graça neighborhood history only occurred after the earthquake of 1755, though. The reconstruction of the city led an increasingly large number of workers to seek Graça to reside in. Not only was the land cheap, but the neighborhood was also close to downtown. It was only in the early twentieth century that the neighborhood definitely lost its rural aspect, with the construction of the Santa Apolónia railway. This revolutionized the industrial life of the neighborhood, which suddenly saw the emergence of multiple ateliers, and attracted many working class and white-collar workers. This dynamism led to several associations such as the Savings Bank Workers and Desportivo da Graça Club. Nowadays Graça is this charming neighborhood where you can find a mixture of old and new, where the spirit of old Lisbon and the renewal brought about by the new inhabitants and tourists is felt while you can appreciate the best viewpoints in Lisboa. The viewpoint of Graça and the viewpoint of Senhora do Monte will allow you to enjoy an unobstructed view over the capital.
Belém was originally the location of Lisbon’s shipyards and harbors, and from here Portuguese 15th century explorers discovered sea routes to India, Africa and Brazil. Many of the historic monuments found in Belém either commemorate this glorious past, or were funded by the vast wealth that flowed into Portugal from the colonies. Belém is the perfect place to spend a sunny summer day, it is filled with parks, tree-lined plazas and green open spaces, and is a breath of fresh air from claustrophobic and chaotic central Lisbon. If you are a history fan then probably one day won’t be enough for you to explore all the museums and monuments that Belém has to offer you. Belém's main street and historical avenue is Rua de Belém, a strip of 160-year-old buildings that have survived several years of change and modernization. This includes the famous pastry shop Fábrica de Pastéis de Belém known for a specific Portuguese confectionery: pastel de Belém. In the heart of Belém is the Praça do Império, an avenue of open-spaces and gardens, with a central fountain, which was laid-out during World War II. To the west of the gardens lies the Centro Cultural de Belém, built in 1992 during Portugal's term in the revolving role at the helm of the European Union presidency. It is now an arts complex, containing Belém's Museu Colecção Berardo. To the southeast of the gardens is the Belém Palace (1770), the official residence of the Portuguese President. Belém is home to a number of other museums and monuments like the Electricity Museum, Museum of Art, Architecture and Technology, Macau Cultural Museum, Folk Art Museum, Coach Museum, and the Presidential Museum, Belém Tower, Jerónimos Monastery and the Monument to the discoveries.
135 penduduk tempatan mengesyorkan
Belem
135 penduduk tempatan mengesyorkan
Belém was originally the location of Lisbon’s shipyards and harbors, and from here Portuguese 15th century explorers discovered sea routes to India, Africa and Brazil. Many of the historic monuments found in Belém either commemorate this glorious past, or were funded by the vast wealth that flowed into Portugal from the colonies. Belém is the perfect place to spend a sunny summer day, it is filled with parks, tree-lined plazas and green open spaces, and is a breath of fresh air from claustrophobic and chaotic central Lisbon. If you are a history fan then probably one day won’t be enough for you to explore all the museums and monuments that Belém has to offer you. Belém's main street and historical avenue is Rua de Belém, a strip of 160-year-old buildings that have survived several years of change and modernization. This includes the famous pastry shop Fábrica de Pastéis de Belém known for a specific Portuguese confectionery: pastel de Belém. In the heart of Belém is the Praça do Império, an avenue of open-spaces and gardens, with a central fountain, which was laid-out during World War II. To the west of the gardens lies the Centro Cultural de Belém, built in 1992 during Portugal's term in the revolving role at the helm of the European Union presidency. It is now an arts complex, containing Belém's Museu Colecção Berardo. To the southeast of the gardens is the Belém Palace (1770), the official residence of the Portuguese President. Belém is home to a number of other museums and monuments like the Electricity Museum, Museum of Art, Architecture and Technology, Macau Cultural Museum, Folk Art Museum, Coach Museum, and the Presidential Museum, Belém Tower, Jerónimos Monastery and the Monument to the discoveries.
Cascais is a delightful Portuguese fishing town, and is the Lisbon’s coastline most popular holiday destination. Historically, Cascais was a minor fishing village, until King Luís I (1838 - 1889) choose it as his royal summer retreat. The Portuguese high society followed him and start constructing ornate mansions and exquisite gardens. Relax in the environment of Cascais while enjoying a delicious ice cream from Santini - the most famous Portuguese ice cream shop, opened in 1949 in this inspiring town. The Boca do Inferno (Hell’s Mouth) is a collapsed cave and series of highly weathered cliffs, 2km to the north of Cascais. The unique rock formations of the Boca do Inferno have been eroded by the powerful Atlantic seas, which ceaseless batter the coastline. Over these jagged outcrops, amateur Portuguese fishermen clamber, with a serious risk of injury, hoping to find the perfect fishing spot. The Boca do Inferno is an interesting detour from a day’s sightseeing in Cascais and is a pleasant 20-minute walk from the marina, which follows the coastal road. Sintra is one of Europe's most romantic and enchanting towns just a 40-minute train ride away from central Lisbon. Its impressive concentration of extravagant palaces, opulent mansions and the ruins of an ancient castle hidden within the pine covered hills of Serra de Sintra will take you away on a time travel to the past. The fresh air and the views of Sintra while you appreciate the Palacio da Pena, Quinta da Regaleira and Mouros Castle makes it a destination not to be missed.
51 penduduk tempatan mengesyorkan
Sintra
51 penduduk tempatan mengesyorkan
Cascais is a delightful Portuguese fishing town, and is the Lisbon’s coastline most popular holiday destination. Historically, Cascais was a minor fishing village, until King Luís I (1838 - 1889) choose it as his royal summer retreat. The Portuguese high society followed him and start constructing ornate mansions and exquisite gardens. Relax in the environment of Cascais while enjoying a delicious ice cream from Santini - the most famous Portuguese ice cream shop, opened in 1949 in this inspiring town. The Boca do Inferno (Hell’s Mouth) is a collapsed cave and series of highly weathered cliffs, 2km to the north of Cascais. The unique rock formations of the Boca do Inferno have been eroded by the powerful Atlantic seas, which ceaseless batter the coastline. Over these jagged outcrops, amateur Portuguese fishermen clamber, with a serious risk of injury, hoping to find the perfect fishing spot. The Boca do Inferno is an interesting detour from a day’s sightseeing in Cascais and is a pleasant 20-minute walk from the marina, which follows the coastal road. Sintra is one of Europe's most romantic and enchanting towns just a 40-minute train ride away from central Lisbon. Its impressive concentration of extravagant palaces, opulent mansions and the ruins of an ancient castle hidden within the pine covered hills of Serra de Sintra will take you away on a time travel to the past. The fresh air and the views of Sintra while you appreciate the Palacio da Pena, Quinta da Regaleira and Mouros Castle makes it a destination not to be missed.